14 Best RSS Feed Readers for Linux in 2018

There is a wealth of information on the web that you probably want to keep up to date with; from news, to how tos, guides, tutorials and more. Imagine having to visit, on a daily basis, all your favorite blogs or websites – it’s a bit of a challenge, especially if you have a tight schedule. This is where RSS comes into play.

RSS (Rich Site Summary or also Really Simple Syndication) is a popular and standardized web format used to deliver regularly changing content on the web. It is employed by blogs, news-related sites as well as other sites to deliver their content as an RSS Feed to internet users interested in it.

RSS feeds enable you to see when blogs or websites have added new content so you can get the latest headlines, videos and images within a single interface, immediately after being published, without necessarily visiting the news sources (you have taken the feeds from).

To subscribe to a feed, simply go to your favorite blog or site, copy the RSS URL and paste it into your RSS feed reader: do this for sites you visit frequently.


For example, Tecmint.com RSS feed URL is:

https://www.tecmint.com/feed/

In this article, we will review 14 RSS Feed readers for Linux systems. The list is not arranged in any particular order.

1. FeedReader

FeedReader is a free, open source, modern and highly customizable RSS client for Linux desktop. It supports keyboard shortcuts, comes with a fast search and filters feature, and supports desktop notifications. FeedReader also supports tags for categorizing and sorting articles. Importantly, it offers amazing consistency in article formating.

FeedReader for Linux

FeedReader for Linux

It allows you to save your feeds to pocket, instapaper or wallabag for later reading. You can also share feeds with friends via twitter, telegram or email. And it supports podcasts. In addition, you can choose from four themes and use the dconf-editor to tweak it.

Last but not least, it works with third-party applications (such as Feedbin, Feedly, FreshRSS, InoReader, LocalRSS, Tiny Tiny RSS, TheOldReader, and more) to extend its functionality.

Install FeedReader in Linux

FeedReader can be easily installed using Flatpak on all major Linux distributions.

$ flatpak install http://feedreader.xarbit.net/feedreader-repo/feedreader.flatpakref
$ flatpak run org.gnome.FeedReader

2. RSSowl

RSSowl is a free, powerful, cross-platform desktop RSS feed reader that runs on Linux, Windows and MacOS. It helps you to organize your feeds the way you want, under various categories, instantly search, and read feeds conveniently.

RSSOwl Feed Reader for Linux

RSSOwl Feed Reader for Linux

It allows you to save searches and use them like feeds and supports notifications. It also offers news bins for storing news entires that you consider very important. RSSowl also supports labels for associating keywords with news entries and more.

3. TinyTiny RSS

Tiny Tiny RSS is a free open source web-based RSS/Atom reader and aggregator, powered by AJAX. To host it, you need to setup a LEMP or LAMP stack on your system. Then use a web browser to read news; there is an Android app for mobile users.

TinyTiny RSS for Linux

TinyTiny RSS for Linux

It supports keyboard shortcuts, several languages and allows for feed aggregation/syndication. TT RSS also supports podcasts and allows you to share new entries in various ways including via RSS feeds, social networks, or sharing by URL, and many more.

It supports flexible article filtering, and automatically identifies and filters duplicate articles. It comes with multiple themes to customize its look and feel, and there are plugins to extend its core functionality. You can integrate it with external applications via a JSON-based API. In addition, it supports OPML import/export and more.

4. Akregator

Akregator is a very powerful news RSS/Atom feed reader for KDE, designed to get feeds from hundreds of news sources. It is easy to use and very convenient. It ships in with an embedded browser for reading news in a simple and convenient way, and can be integrated with Konqueror to add news feeds.

Akregator Feed Reader for Linux

Akregator Feed Reader for Linux

Install Akregator in Linux

If you are using KDE desktop, most likely Akregator is already installed. If not, you can use the following command to install it.

$ sudo apt install akregator

5. FreshRSS

FreshRSS is a free open source, fast, lightweight, powerful and customizable web-based RSS feed reader and aggregator. It is a multi-user application and has a terminal interface for those who like to work from the command-line. To self-host it, all you need is to install a LAMP or LEMP stack on your system.

FreshRSS Reader for Linux

FreshRSS Reader for Linux

It is easy to use, very responsive with good mobile support. FressRSS supports anonymous reading mode, and instant notifications from compatible sites, via PubSubHubbub. It comes with various extensions to improve its core functionality, and an API for (mobile) clients.

6. Selfoss

Selfoss is a free open source, modern, lightweight and multipurpose web-based RSS reader, developed using PHP (therefore self-hostable). It can also be used for live stream, mashup, and as a universal aggregation.

Selfoss RSS Reader

Selfoss RSS Reader

It comes with amazing mobile support (apps) for Android, iOS and tablets. It supports plugins for further tuning, and it also supports OPML import. In addition, you can integrate it with other external applications or develope you own plugins with the help of a Restful JSON API.

7. QuiteRSS

QuiteRSS is a free open source, cross-platform and feature-rich RSS feed reader. It works on Linux, Windows and MacOS. It comes in a multitude of languages around the world. It automatically update news feeds on startup and via a timer.

QuiteRSS Reader for Linux

QuiteRSS Reader for Linux

QuiteRSS supports shortcuts, OPML import/export, quick search in browser, and filters (user, feed and news filters). It also supports notifications (pop-up and sound), displays new or unread news counter on your system tray.

If you don’t want to view images in preview, this application allows you to disable them. And for security minded users, it allows you to configure a proxy either automatically or manually. It also comes with an ad-lock, internal browser and so much more.

Install QuiteRSS on Linux

Simply add the following PPA to install QuiteRSS on Debian based systems.

$ sudo add-apt-repository ppa:quiterss/quiterss
$ sudo apt-get update
$ sudo apt-get install quiterss

8. Liferea (Linux Feed Reader)

Liferea is a free open source, web-based feed reader and news aggregator for Linux. It is considered one of the best RSS feed readers on Ubuntu Linux. It has a simple interface allowing you to easily organize and browse feeds.

Liferea Feed Reader for Linux

Liferea Feed Reader for Linux

It comes with an embedded graphical browser, supports reading articles while offline, and supports podcats. It also provides news bins for permanently saving headlines, and allows you to match items using search folders. And Liferea can be synchronizes with InoReader, Reedah, TheOldReader and TinyTinyRSS.

Install Liferea in Linux

$ sudo apt-get install liferea [On Ubuntu/Debian]
$ sudo dnf install liferea [On Fedora]

9. OpenTICKR

OpenTickr is a free open source, highly customizable GTK-based RSS reader that shows feeds in a TICKER bar on your Linux desktop with a fast and smooth scroller. It’s a native Linux program developed using C with GTK+ and Libxml2; it can also run on Windows with MinGW support.

Tickr Feed Reader for Linux

Tickr Feed Reader for Linux

It supports bookmarking of your favorite feeds, and allows you to easily play, pause or reload the current feed. Other than using remote XML resources, you can use it with any text file. In addition, it is highly scriptable, since all its parameters can be passed from command-line, and much more.

10. MiniFlux

MiniFlux is a free open source, very simple, lightweight and fast RSS/Atom/JSON feed reader, developed in Go and Postgresql. It is easy to install and use, and comes with a few useful features. It comes in six languages: Chinese, Dutch, English, French, German, and Polish.

MiniFlux Feed Reader for Linux

MiniFlux Feed Reader for Linux

It supports OPML import/export, bookmarks, and categories. For YouTube lovers, it allows you to play videos from channels directly from within the program. In addition, it supports multiple enclosures/attachments such as videos, music, images as well as podcasts. With it, you can also save articles to external applications or services.

11. Newsbeuter

Newsbeuter is a free open source, terminal-based RSS/Atom feed reader for Unix-like systems (Linux, FreeBSD, Mac OS X and others). With it, you can connect to any feed source via a highly flexible filter and plugin system. It supports configurable keyboard shortcuts, podcasts, a search facility, category and tag system, as well as OPML import/export.

NewBeuter RSS Feed Reader

NewBeuter RSS Feed Reader

Newsbeuter uses a powerful query language to set meta feeds and you can automatically delete unwanted articles via a killfile.

Install Newsbeuter on Linux

Newsbeuter is available to install from the default system repository using following command.

$ sudo apt-get install newsbeuter

12. Snownews

Snownews is a free open source, simple, lightweight, fast and fully featured command-line RSS feed reader for Unix-like systems, with color support.

Snownews RSS Reader

Snownews RSS Reader

It is a native Unix program written in C and has few external dependencies (ncurses and libxml2). It comes with an embedded HTTP client which follows server redirects and automatically updates feed URLs that point to permanent redirects (301).

It supports HTTP proxy and authentication(basic and digest methods), feed categories, OPML import, and uses fully customizable keyboard shortcuts. Snownews also uses a local cache to minimize network traffic, hence boosting its performance. Furthermore, you can extend it via plug-ins; it is available in several languages, and much more.

13. Newsroom

Newsroom is a free open-source, simple, modern and cross-platform command-line utility to get your favorite news, developed using NodeJS. It runs on Linux systems, Mac OSX as well as Windows.

Newsroom Commandline RSS Reader

Newsroom Commandline RSS Reader

14. Newsboat

Newsboat (a fork of Newsbeuter) is also a free, open source and simple terminal-based RSS/Atom feed reader. It only runs on Unix-like systems such as GNU/Linux, FreeBSD and MacOS.

Newsboat Commandline RSS Reader

Newsboat Commandline RSS Reader

Summary

RSS is a standardized format used to deliver regularly changing content on the web. In this article, we have explained 14 RSS Feed readers for Linux systems. If we have missed any application in the list above, let us know via the feedback form below.

How to Change Console Fonts in Ubuntu Server

By default, Ubuntu server software is designed to run without a graphical environment. Therefore, a fresh installation of Ubuntu server can only be managed via a console (the black background and white text, and a command prompt – after successful login), but for some reason you might like to change the font on your console for better appearance.

In this article, we will show you how to change console fonts and font size on Ubuntu server.

The file console-setup specifies the encoding and the font as well as font size to be implemented by the setupcon program. This program sets up the font and keyboard on the console of the Ubuntu server.

The default font and font size on Ubuntu server console is normally VGA and 8X16 respectively, which does not really look nice (especially if you have developed a strong liking for gorgeous looking fonts on the terminal, like we have), as shown in the following screenshot.

Default Ubuntu Server Fonts

Default Ubuntu Server Fonts


To change Ubuntu server console font, run the following command to reconfigure the console-setup file, this requires root privileges, so use the sudo command as shown.

$ sudo dpkg-reconfigure console-setup

Then choose the encoding to use on the console, you may leave the default, and press [Enter].

Choose Encoding in Ubuntu

Choose Encoding in Ubuntu

Next, choose the character set to support, you may leave the default, and press [Enter] to continue.

Choose Character Set in Ubuntu

Choose Character Set in Ubuntu

In this step, choose the font you want to use, for example we will use Fixed, so we will select it and press [Enter].

Choose Console Font in Ubuntu

Choose Console Font in Ubuntu

Finally, choose the font size, and we have selected 8X18. Then press [Enter]. Your console font will now change and the system will apply the recent changes. Once everything is done, your command prompt should appear with text formated in the new font.

Choose Font Size in Ubuntu

Choose Font Size in Ubuntu

The following screenshot shows the Ubuntu server console with the Fixed font type and font size of 8×18.

New Fonts in Ubuntu Server

New Fonts in Ubuntu Server

For more information, see the console-setup and setupcon man pages.

$ man console-setup
$ man setupcon

That’s it! In this article, we have explained how to change console font and font size on Ubuntu server. To ask any questions, use the comment form below.

How to Install MySQL 8.0 in Ubuntu 18.04

MySQL community server is a free open source, popular and cross-platform database management system. It supports both SQL and NoSQL, and has a pluggable storage engine architecture. Additionally, it also comes with multiple database connectors for different programming languages, allowing you to develop applications using any of the well known languages, and many other features.

It has many use cases under document storage, cloud, high availability systems, IoT (Internet of Things), hadoop, big data, data warehousing, LAMP or LEMP stack for supporting high-volume website/apps and much more.

In this article, we will explain a fresh installation of MySQL 8.0 database system on Ubuntu 18.04 Bionic Beaver. Before we move onto the actual installation steps, let’s look at a summary of:

What’s New in MySQL 8.0

  • The database now incorporates a transactional data dictionary.
  • Comes with Atomic DDL statement support.
  • Enhanced security and account management.
  • Improvements to resource management.
  • Several InnoDB enhancements.
  • New type of backup lock.
  • Default character set has changed to utf8mb4 from latin1.
  • A couple of JSON enhancements.
  • Comes with regular expression support using International Components for Unicode (ICU).
  • New error logging which now uses the MySQL component architecture.
  • Enhancements to MySQL replication.
  • Supports common table expressions(both non-recursive and recursive).
  • Has an enhanced optimizer.
  • Additional window functions and more.

Step 1: Add MySQL Apt Repository

Luckily, there is an APT repository for installing the MySQL server, client, and other components. You need to add this MySQL repository to your system’s package sources list; start by downloading the repository package using the wget tool from the command line.

$ wget -c https://dev.mysql.com/get/mysql-apt-config_0.8.10-1_all.deb 


Then install the MySQL repository package using the following dpkg command.

$ sudo dpkg -i mysql-apt-config_0.8.10-1_all.deb 

Note that in the package installation process, you will be prompted to choose MySQL server version and other components such as cluster, shared client libraries, or the MySQL workbench that you want to configure for installation.

MySQL server version mysql-8.0 will be auto-selected, then scroll down to the last option Ok and click [Enter] to finish the configuration and installation of the release package, as shown in the screenshot.

Configure MySQL APT Config

Configure MySQL APT Config

Step 2: Install MySQL Server in Ubuntu 18.04

Next, download the latest package information from all configured repositories, including the recently added MySQL repository.

$ sudo apt update

Then run the following command to install packages for the MySQL community server, client and the database common files.

$ sudo apt-get install mysql-server
Install MySQL 8.0 in Ubuntu 18.04

Install MySQL 8.0 in Ubuntu 18.04

Through the installation process, you will be asked to enter a password for the root user for your MySQL server, re-enter the password to confirm it and press [Enter].

Set MySQL Root Password

Set MySQL Root Password

Next, the MySQL server authentication plugin configuration message will appear, read through it and use the right arrow to choose Ok and press [Enter] to continue.

MySQL Authentication Configuration

MySQL Authentication Configuration

Afterwards, you will be asked to select the default authentication plugin to use, then use the right arrow to choose Ok and press [Enter] to complete the package configuration.

Select MySQL Authentication Plugin

Select MySQL Authentication Plugin

Step 3: Secure MySQL Server Installation

By default, the MySQL installation is unsecure. To secure it, run the security script which comes with the binary package. You will be asked to enter the root password you set during the installation process. Then also choose whether to use the VALIDATE PASSWORD plugin or not.

You can also change the root password you set before (as we have done in this example). Then enter yes/y to the following security questions:

  • Remove anonymous users? (Press y|Y for Yes, any other key for No) : y
  • Disallow root login remotely? (Press y|Y for Yes, any other key for No) : y
  • Remove test database and access to it? (Press y|Y for Yes, any other key for No) : y
  • Reload privilege tables now? (Press y|Y for Yes, any other key for No) : y

Launch the script by issuing the following command.

$ sudo mysql_secure_installation
Secure MySQL Server Installation

Secure MySQL Server Installation

To further secure your MySQL server, read our article 12 MySQL/MariaDB Security Best Practices for Linux.

Step 4: Managing MySQL Server via Systemd

On Ubuntu, after installing a package, it’s service(s) are usually started automatically once the package is configured. You can check if the MySQL server is up and running using following command.

$ sudo systemctl status mysql
Check MySQL Server Status

Check MySQL Server Status

If for one reason or the other, it isn’t auto-started, use the commands below to start and enable it to start at system boot time, as follows.

$ sudo systemctl status mysql
$ sudo systemctl enable mysql

Step 5: Install Extra MySQL Products and Components

In addition, you can install extra MySQL components that you feel you need in order to work with the server, such as mysql-workbench-community, libmysqlclient18 and many others.

$ sudo apt-get update
$ sudo apt-get install mysql-workbench-community libmysqlclient18

Finally, to access the MySQL shell, issue the following command.

$ sudo mysql -u root -p
Connect to MySQL Server

Connect to MySQL Server

For more information, read the MySQL 8.0 Release Notes.

That’s It! In this article, we have explained how to install MySQL 8.0 in Ubuntu 18.04 Bioni Beaver. If you have any questions or thoughts to share, use the comment form below to reach us.

How to Configure Network Static IP Address in Ubuntu 18.04

Netplan is a new command-line network configuration utility introduced in Ubuntu 17.10 to manage and configure network settings easily in Ubuntu systems. It allows you to configure a network interface using YAML abstraction. It works in conjunction with the NetworkManager and systemd-networkd networking daemons (referred to as renderers, you can choose which one of these to use) as interfaces to the kernel.

It reads network configuration described in /etc/netplan/*.yaml and you can store configurations for all your network interfaces in these files.

In this article, we will explain how to configure a network static or dynamic IP address for a network interface in Ubuntu 18.04 using Netplan utility.

List All Active Network Interfaces on Ubuntu

First, you need to identify the network interface you are going to configure. You can list all attached network interfaces on your system using the ifconfig command as shown.

$ ifconfig -a
Check Network Interfaces in Ubuntu

Check Network Interfaces in Ubuntu


From the output of the above command, we have 3 interfaces attached to the Ubuntu system: 2 ethernet interfaces and the loop back interface. However, the enp0s8 ethernet interface has not been configured and has no static IP address.

Set Static IP Address in Ubuntu 18.04

In this example, we will configure a static IP for the enp0s8 ethernet network interface. Open the netplan configuration file using your text editor as shown.

Important: In case a YAML file is not created by the distribution installer, you can generate the required configuration for the renderers with this command.

$ sudo netplan generate 

In addition, auto generated files may have different filenames on desktop, servers, cloud instantiations etc (for example 01-network-manager-all.yaml or 01-netcfg.yaml), but all files under /etc/netplan/*.yaml will be read by netplan.

$ sudo vim /etc/netplan/01-netcfg.yaml 

Then add the following configuration under the ethernet section.

enp0s8: dhcp4: no
dhcp6: no
addresses: [192.168.56.110/24, ]
gateway4: 192.168.56.1
nameservers:
addresses: [8.8.8.8, 8.8.4.4]

Where:

  • enp0s8 – network interface name.
  • dhcp4 and dhcp6 – dhcp properties of an interface for IPv4 and IPv6 receptively.
  • addresses – sequence of static addresses to the interface.
  • gateway4 – IPv4 address for default gateway.
  • nameservers – sequence of IP addresses for nameserver.

Once you have added, your configuration file should now have the following content, as shown in the following screenshot. The first interface enp0s3 is configured to use DHCP and enp0s8 will use a static IP address.

The addresses property of an interface expects a sequence entry for example [192.168.14.2/24, “2001:1::1/64”] or [192.168.56.110/24, ] (see netplan man page for more information).

# This file describes the network interfaces available on your system
# For more information, see netplan(5).
network:
version: 2
renderer: networkd
ethernets:
enp0s3:
dhcp4: yes
enp0s8:
dhcp4: no
dhcp6: no
addresses: [192.168.56.110/24, ]
gateway4: 192.168.56.1
nameservers:
addresses: [8.8.8.8, 8.8.4.4]
Configure Static IP in Ubuntu

Configure Static IP in Ubuntu

Save the file and exit. Then apply the recent network changes using following netplan command.

$ sudo netplan apply

Now verify all the available network interfaces once more time, the enp0s8 ethernet interface should now be connected to the local network, and have an IP addresses as shown in the following screenshot.

$ ifconfig -a
Verify Network Interfaces in Ubuntu

Verify Network Interfaces in Ubuntu

Set Dynamic DHCP IP Address in Ubuntu

To configure the enp0s8 ethernet interface to receive an IP address dynamically through DHCP, simply use the following configuration.

# This file describes the network interfaces available on your system
# For more information, see netplan(5).
network:
version: 2
renderer: networkd
ethernets:
enp0s8:
dhcp4: yes
dhcp6: yes

Save the file and exit. Then apply the recent network changes and verify the IP address using following commands.

$ sudo netplan apply
$ ifconfig -a

From now on your system will get an IP address dynamically from a router.

You can find more information and configuration options by consulting the netplan man page.

$ man netplan

Congratulations! You’ve successfully configured a network static IP addresses to your Ubuntu servers. If you have any queries, share them with us via the comment form below.

A Bash Script to Create a Bootable USB from ISO in Linux

Bootiso is a powerful Bash script to easily and securely create a bootable USB device from one ISO file. It helps you create a bootable USB from an ISO with a single command from the terminal. It is a well tailored script that carefully organized and validated using shellcheck.

It has to be run with root authority, and if external programs it requires are not available on your system, it will ask you to install them and exits. Bootiso checks that the selected ISO has the correct mime-type, otherwise it exits. To prevent system damages, it ensures that the selected device is connected only via USB.

Read Also: 3 Ways to Extract and Copy Files from ISO Image in Linux

Before formating and partitioning your USB device, it prompts you to accept execution of the actions to prevent any data loss. Importantly, it manages any failure from an internal command appropriately exits. In addition, it performs a cleanup of any temporary files on exit by employing the trap utility.

Install Bootiso Script in Linux


The easy way to install bootiso from sources is to clone the git repository and set execute permission as shown.

$ git clone https://github.com/jsamr/bootiso.git
$ cd bootiso/
$ chmod +x bootiso

Next, move the script to a bin path (for example ~/bin/ or /usr/local/bin/) to run it like any other Linux commands on your system.

$ mv bootiso ~/bin/

Once installed, the syntax for running bootiso is to provide the ISO as first argument.

$ bootiso myfile.iso

To create a bootable USB device from ISO file, first you need to list all available USB drives attached to your system using the -l flag as shown.

$ bootiso -l
Listing USB drives available in your system:
NAME HOTPLUG SIZE STATE TYPE
sdb 1 14.9G running disk

Next, to make the device (/dev/sdb) as a bootable device, simply provide the ISO as the first argument. Note that if there is only one USB device attached to the system (as in the case above), the script will automatically select it, otherwise, it will ask you to select from an auto-generated list of all attached USB drives.

$ sudo bootiso ~/Templates/eXternOS.iso 
Create Bootable USB in Linux Terminal

Create Bootable USB in Linux Terminal

You may also use the -a flag to enable autoselecting USB drives in conjunction with -y (disables prompting user before formating USB drive) option as shown.

$ sudo bootiso -a -y ~/Templates/eXternOS.iso

If you have multiple USB devices connected to the system, you can use the -d flag to explicitly specify the USB device you want to make bootable from the command line as shown.

$ sudo bootiso -d /dev/sdb ~/Templates/eXternOS.iso 

By default, bootiso uses mount + rsync to employ dd command instead, add the --dd flag as shown.

$ sudo bootiso --dd -d ~/Templates/eXternOS.iso 

In addition, for non-hybrid ISOs, you can install a bootloader with syslinux with the -b option, as follows. This option however does not support the dd command.

$ sudo bootiso -b /ptah/to/non-hybrid/file.iso
OR
$ sudo bootiso -bd /usb/device /ptah/to/non-hybrid/file.iso

For more information on other bootiso capabilities and options, see the help message.

$ bootiso -h 

Bootiso Github repository: https://github.com/jsamr/bootiso

That’s It! Bootiso is a powerful Bash script to easily and securely create a bootable USB device from one ISO file, with a single command on the terminal. Use the comment form below to share your thoughts about it or ask questions.

The Ultimate Guide to Learn JavaScript in 2018

‘,
enableHover: false,
enableTracking: true,
buttons: { twitter: {via: ‘tecmint’}},
click: function(api, options){
api.simulateClick();
api.openPopup(‘twitter’);
}
});
jQuery(‘#facebook’).sharrre({
share: {
facebook: true
},
template: ‘{total}’,
enableHover: false,
enableTracking: true,
click: function(api, options){
api.simulateClick();
api.openPopup(‘facebook’);
}
});
jQuery(‘#googleplus’).sharrre({
share: {
googlePlus: true
},
template: ‘{total}’,
enableHover: false,
enableTracking: true,
urlCurl: ‘https://www.tecmint.com/wp-content/themes/tecmint/js/sharrre.php’,
click: function(api, options){
api.simulateClick();
api.openPopup(‘googlePlus’);
}
});
jQuery(‘#linkedin’).sharrre({
share: {
linkedin: true
},
template: ‘{total}’,
enableHover: false,
enableTracking: true,
buttons: {
linkedin: {
description: ‘The Ultimate Guide to Learn JavaScript in 2018’,media: ‘https://www.tecmint.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/Learn-JavaScript-Programming.jpg’ }
},
click: function(api, options){
api.simulateClick();
api.openPopup(‘linkedin’);
}
});
// Scrollable sharrre bar, contributed by Erik Frye. Awesome!
var shareContainer = jQuery(“.sharrre-container”),
header = jQuery(‘#header’),
postEntry = jQuery(‘.entry’),
$window = jQuery(window),
distanceFromTop = 20,
startSharePosition = shareContainer.offset(),
contentBottom = postEntry.offset().top + postEntry.outerHeight(),
topOfTemplate = header.offset().top;
getTopSpacing();
shareScroll = function(){
if($window.width() > 719){ var scrollTop = $window.scrollTop() + topOfTemplate,
stopLocation = contentBottom – (shareContainer.outerHeight() + topSpacing);
if(scrollTop > stopLocation){
shareContainer.offset({top: contentBottom – shareContainer.outerHeight(),left: startSharePosition.left});
}
else if(scrollTop >= postEntry.offset().top-topSpacing){
shareContainer.offset({top: scrollTop + topSpacing, left: startSharePosition.left});
}else if(scrollTop 1024)
topSpacing = distanceFromTop + jQuery(‘.nav-wrap’).outerHeight();
else
topSpacing = distanceFromTop;
}
});
]]>

How to Install Ubuntu 18.04 Alongside With Windows

This tutorial describes the installation process of the latest release of Ubuntu Desktop 18.04, codename Bionic Beaver, on a dedicated machine or a virtual machine alongside a pre-installed Windows 10 Operating System. The installation process can be done via the Ubuntu Desktop DVD ISO image or via a bootable Ubuntu USB drive.

The Ubuntu Bionic OS will be installed on a UEFI motherboard with Legacy Mode or CSM (Compatibility Support Module) option disabled.

Requirements

  1. Download Ubuntu Desktop 18.04 ISO image for x86_64bit architecture.
  2. A direct or a proxy internet connection.
  3. Rufus utility in order to create an Ubuntu Desktop bootable USB drive compatible with UEFI motherboards.

Create Free Space on Windows for Ubuntu Install

On a pre-installed machine with a single Windows 10 partition, you need to create some free space in Windows partition in order to install Ubuntu 18.04.

First login to the system using an account with administrator privileges, open a Command Prompt window with admin rights and execute diskmgmt.msc command to open Disk Management utility.

diskmgmt.msc


Select the Windows partition, usually C: volume, right click on this partition and select Shrink Volume option in order to reduce the partition size.

Windows Disk Management Utility

Windows Disk Management Utility

Wait for the system to collect partition size data, add the desired amount of space you want to shrink and hit in Shrink button. After the shrink process completes, a new unallocated space will be present in your drive. We’ll use this free space to install Ubuntu alongside Windows 10.

New Windows Partition for Ubuntu Install

New Windows Partition for Ubuntu Install

Install Ubuntu 18.4 Alongside with Windows

On the next step, place Ubuntu Desktop DVD ISO image or the bootable USB stick into the appropriate motherboard drive and, reboot the machine and hit the appropriate bootable key ((usually F12, F10 or F2) in order to boot the Ubuntu installer DVD or USB bootable image.

On the first installation screen select Install Ubuntu and hit Enter key to start the installation process.

Select Install Ubuntu

Select Install Ubuntu

In the ”Welcome” screen, select your installation language and hit on Continue button.

Select Ubuntu Installation Language

Select Ubuntu Installation Language

On the next screen, select the keyboard layout for your system and hit on Continue button.

Select Ubuntu Keyboard Layout

Select Ubuntu Keyboard Layout

In the next installation screen, choose Normal installation and hit on Continue button. In this screen you also have the option to perform a Minimal installation of Ubuntu Desktop, which includes only some basic system utilities and a web browser.

You can also turn off Secure Boot option, if this option is enabled in motherboard UEFI settings in order to install third-party software for graphic card, Wi-Fi or additional media formats. Be aware that turning off Secure Boot option requires a password.

Select Ubuntu Install Type

Select Ubuntu Install Type

Next, In Installation type menu, choose Something else option in order to manually partition the hard disk and hit on Continue button.

Ubuntu Manual Partition

Ubuntu Manual Partition

In hard disk partition table menu, select the hard drive free space and hit on + button in order to create the Ubuntu partition.

Select Ubuntu Install Drive

Select Ubuntu Install Drive

In the partition pop-up window, add the size of the partition in MB, choose the partition type as Primary and the partition location at the Beginning of this space.

Next, format this partition with ext4 filesystem and use / as partition mount point. After completing this step, hit on OK button to return to disk utility. Use the same steps as described here in order to create other partitions as required for your installation.

Create Ubuntu Root Partition

Create Ubuntu Root Partition

After you’ve created the required partitions on the disk, select Windows boot Manager as device for the boot loader installation and hit on Install Now button.

Select Ubuntu Boot Manager

Select Ubuntu Boot Manager

In the pop-up window, hit on Continue button in order to commit the changes that will be written to disk and start the installation.

Confirm Ubuntu Partition ChangesConfirm Ubuntu Partition Changes

Confirm Ubuntu Partition Changes

On the next screen, select your location from the provided map and hit on Continue button.

Select Your Country Location

Select Your Country Location

Next, insert your name, the name of your desktop, a username with a strong password and choose the option with ‘Require my password to log in’. When you finish, hit on Continue button and wait for the installation process to complete.

Create Ubuntu User Account

Create Ubuntu User Account

During the installation process, a series of screens which describe Ubuntu Desktop and the installation progress bar will be displayed on your screen. You cannot interfere with the installation process in this final stage.

Ubuntu Installation Progress

Ubuntu Installation Progress

After the installation completes, eject the installation medium and hit on Restart now button in order to reboot the machine.

Ubuntu Installation Finishes

Ubuntu Installation Finishes

After reboot, the system should boot into GNU GRUB menu. In case the GRUB menu is not displayed, restart the machine, go to motherboard UEFI settings and change boot order or Boot Options -> BBS priority.

The settings to enable GRUB menu highly depends on your machine motherboard UEFI settings. You should consult motherboard documentation in order to identify the settings that need to be changed in order to display GRUB menu.

Ubuntu Boot Grub Menu

Ubuntu Boot Grub Menu

Finally, login to Ubuntu 18.04 Desktop with the credentials configured while installing the system and follow the initial Ubuntu welcome screen in order to start using Ubuntu Desktop.

Ubuntu Login Screen

Ubuntu Login Screen

Ubuntu New Features

Ubuntu New Features

Congratulations! You have successfully installed Ubuntu 18.04 Bionic Desktop alongside Windows 10 on your machine.

How to Upgrade Fedora 27 to Fedora 28

Fedora 28 was officially released. If you are already using Fedora, you can upgrade your system to the latest version of Fedora 28 using a command-line method or using a GNOME Software for an easy graphical update.

Upgrading Fedora 27 Workstation to Fedora 28

Soon after release time, a notification arrives to inform you that a new version of Fedora is available to upgrade. You can click on the notification to start the GNOME Software or you can choose Software from GNOME Shell.

Fedora Upgrade Notification

Fedora Upgrade Notification

If you don’t see upgrade notification on this screen, try to reload the screen by clicking the reload tool at the top left. It may take some time to see an upgrade available for all systems.

Choose Download to get the upgrade packages. You can continue working until all upgrade packages are downloaded. Then use GNOME Software to reboot your system and apply the upgrade.

Download Fedora Upgrades

Download Fedora Upgrades


Once upgrade process finishes, your system will reboot and you will be able to log in to your newly upgraded Fedora 28 system.

Upgrading Fedora 27 Server to Fedora 28

If you have upgraded from previous Fedora releases, you are probably aware about the dnf upgrade tool. This procedure is the most recommended way to upgrade from Fedora 27 to Fedora 28, as this tool makes your upgrade simple and easy.

Important: Before moving further, make sure to back up your important files. To get help with taking a backup, read our article about taking smart backups with duplicity program.

Update Fedora Software

1. First thing you need to do is to install latest software updates using GNOME Software or enter the following command in a terminal.

# dnf upgrade --refresh

Install Fedora DNF Plugin

2. Next, open a terminal and type the following command to install the DNF plugin on Fedora.

# dnf install dnf-plugin-system-upgrade

Upgrade Fedora Using DNF Plugin

3. Once your system is updated, you can begin Fedora upgrades using following command in a terminal.

# dnf system-upgrade download --releasever=28

This above command will start downloading all software upgrades locally on your machine. If you get any problems while upgrading due to failed dependencies or retired packages, use the ??allowerasing option in the above command. This will enable DNF to delete packages that may be interrupting your system upgrade.

Reboot and Upgrade Fedora

Once all the software upgrades downloaded, your system will be ready for rebooting. To boot your system into the upgrade process, type the following command in a terminal:

# dnf system-upgrade reboot

Once you type above command, your system will reboot and begins the upgrade process. Once upgrade finishes, your system will reboot and you will be able to log in to your newly upgraded Fedora 28 system.

If you face any issues when upgrading and have third-party repositories enabled, you may need to disable these repositories while you are upgrading Fedora.

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enableHover: false,
enableTracking: true,
buttons: { twitter: {via: ‘tecmint’}},
click: function(api, options){
api.simulateClick();
api.openPopup(‘twitter’);
}
});
jQuery(‘#facebook’).sharrre({
share: {
facebook: true
},
template: ‘{total}’,
enableHover: false,
enableTracking: true,
click: function(api, options){
api.simulateClick();
api.openPopup(‘facebook’);
}
});
jQuery(‘#googleplus’).sharrre({
share: {
googlePlus: true
},
template: ‘{total}’,
enableHover: false,
enableTracking: true,
urlCurl: ‘https://www.tecmint.com/wp-content/themes/tecmint/js/sharrre.php’,
click: function(api, options){
api.simulateClick();
api.openPopup(‘googlePlus’);
}
});
jQuery(‘#linkedin’).sharrre({
share: {
linkedin: true
},
template: ‘{total}’,
enableHover: false,
enableTracking: true,
buttons: {
linkedin: {
description: ‘Get Dashlane Password Manager with 3-Yr Premium Subscription’,media: ‘https://www.tecmint.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/Dashlane-Password-Manager-for-PC.png’ }
},
click: function(api, options){
api.simulateClick();
api.openPopup(‘linkedin’);
}
});
// Scrollable sharrre bar, contributed by Erik Frye. Awesome!
var shareContainer = jQuery(“.sharrre-container”),
header = jQuery(‘#header’),
postEntry = jQuery(‘.entry’),
$window = jQuery(window),
distanceFromTop = 20,
startSharePosition = shareContainer.offset(),
contentBottom = postEntry.offset().top + postEntry.outerHeight(),
topOfTemplate = header.offset().top;
getTopSpacing();
shareScroll = function(){
if($window.width() > 719){ var scrollTop = $window.scrollTop() + topOfTemplate,
stopLocation = contentBottom – (shareContainer.outerHeight() + topSpacing);
if(scrollTop > stopLocation){
shareContainer.offset({top: contentBottom – shareContainer.outerHeight(),left: startSharePosition.left});
}
else if(scrollTop >= postEntry.offset().top-topSpacing){
shareContainer.offset({top: scrollTop + topSpacing, left: startSharePosition.left});
}else if(scrollTop 1024)
topSpacing = distanceFromTop + jQuery(‘.nav-wrap’).outerHeight();
else
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}
});
]]>

How to Install ionCube Loader in Debian and Ubuntu

ionCube loader is a PHP extension (module) that enables PHP to load files protected and encoded using ionCube Encoder software, which is mostly used in commercial software applications to protect their source code and prevent it from being visible and detectable.

Read Also: How to Install ionCube Loader in CentOS 7

In this article, we will explain how to install and configure ionCube Loader with PHP in Debian and Ubuntu distributions.

Prerequisites:

A Ubuntu or Debian server running with a web server (Apache or Nginx) along with a PHP installed. If you don’t have a web server and PHP on your system, you can install them using apt package manager as shown.

Step 1: Install Apache or Nginx Web Server with PHP


1. If you already have a running web server Apache or Nginx with PHP installed on your system, you can jump to the Step 2, otherwise use the following apt command to install them.

-------------------- Install Apache with PHP --------------------
$ sudo apt install apache2 php7.0 php7.0-fpm php7.0-cli -------------------- Install Nginx with PHP -------------------- $ sudo apt install nginx php7.0 php7.0-fpm php7.0-cli

2. Once you’ve installed Apache or Nginx with PHP on your system, you can start the web server and active it to auto start at system boot using following commands.

-------------------- Start Apache Web Server --------------------
$ sudo systemctl start apache2
$ sudo systemctl enable apache2
-------------------- Start Nginx + PHP-FPM Server --------------------
$ sudo systemctl start nginx
$ sudo systemctl enable nginx
$ sudo systemctl start php7.0-fpm
$ sudo systemctl enable php7.0-fpm

Step 2: Download IonCube Loader

3. Go to the inocube’s website and download the installation files, but before that you need to check whether your Linux distribution is running on 64-bit or 32-bit architecture using the following command.

$ uname -r
Linux TecMint 4.4.0-21-generic #37-Ubuntu SMP Mon Apr 18 18:33:37 UTC 2016 x86_64 x86_64 x86_64 GNU/Linux

The above output clearly shows that the system is running on 64-bit architecture.

As per your Linux distribution architecture, download ioncube loader files to /tmp directory using following wget command.

-------------------- For 64-bit System --------------------
$ cd /tmp
$ wget https://downloads.ioncube.com/loader_downloads/ioncube_loaders_lin_x86-64.tar.gz
-------------------- For 32-bit System --------------------
$ cd /tmp
$ wget https://downloads.ioncube.com/loader_downloads/ioncube_loaders_lin_x86.tar.gz

4. Then uncompress the downloaded file using the tar command and switch into the unzipped folder. Then run the ls command to list the various ioncube loader files for different PHP versions.

$ tar -xvf ioncube_loaders_lin_x86*
$ cd ioncube/
$ ls -l
Ioncube Loader Files

Ioncube Loader Files

Step 3: Install ionCube Loader for PHP

5. In the above screenshot, you will see various ioncube loader files for different PHP versions, you need to select the right ioncube loader for your installed PHP version on your server. To know the currently installed php version on your server, run the command.

$ php -v
Check PHP Version in Ubuntu

Check PHP Version in Ubuntu

The above screenshot clearly tells that the system is using PHP 7.0.25 version, in your case it should be different version.

6. Next, find the location of the extension directory for PHP version 7.0.25, it is where the ioncube loader file will be installed.

$ php -i | grep extension_dir
extension_dir => /usr/lib/php/20151012 => /usr/lib/php/20151012

7. Next we need to copy ioncube loader for our PHP 7.0.25 version to the extension directory (/usr/lib/php/20151012).

$ sudo cp /tmp/ioncube/ioncube_loader_lin_7.0.so /usr/lib/php/20151012

Note: Make sure to replace the PHP version and extension directory in the above command according to your system configuration.

Step 4: Configure ionCube Loader for PHP

8. Now we need to configure ioncube loader to work with PHP, in the php.ini file. Debian and Ubuntu use different php.ini files for PHP CLI and PHP-FPM as shown.

$ sudo vi /etc/php/7.0/cli/php.ini #for PHP CLI $ sudo vi /etc/php/7.0/fpm/php.ini #for PHP-FPM & Nginx
$ sudo vi /etc/php/7.0/apache2/php.ini #for Apache2 

Then add below line as the first line in the respective php.ini files.

zend_extension = /usr/lib/php/20151012/ioncube_loader_lin_7.0.so

Note: Make sure to replace the extension directory location and PHP version in the above command according to your system configuration.

9. Then save and exit the file. Now we need to restart the Apache or Nginx web server for the ioncube loaders to come into effect.

-------------------- Start Apache Web Server --------------------
$ sudo systemctl restart apache2
-------------------- Start Nginx + PHP-FPM Server --------------------
$ sudo systemctl restart nginx
$ sudo systemctl restart php-fpm

Step 5: Test ionCube Loader

10. Now it’s time to verify that the ionCube loader is properly installed and configured on your server by checking PHP version one more time. You should be able to see a message indicating that PHP is installed and configured with the ioncube loader extension (status should be enabled), as shown in the output below.

$ php -v
PHP 7.0.25-0ubuntu0.16.04.1 (cli) ( NTS )
Copyright (c) 1997-2017 The PHP Group
Zend Engine v3.0.0, Copyright (c) 1998-2017 Zend Technologies
with the ionCube PHP Loader (enabled) + Intrusion Protection from ioncube24.com (unconfigured) v10.2.0, Copyright (c) 2002-2018, by ionCube Ltd.
with Zend OPcache v7.0.25-0ubuntu0.16.04.1, Copyright (c) 1999-2017, by Zend Technologies

That’s It! In order to secure PHP files, you need to have IonCube loader installed and configured with your installed PHP version, as shown above. We hope that everything worked fine without any issues, otherwise, use the feedback form below to send us your queries.