Rsync with a non-standard ssh port

While doing some work on migrating accounts to a new server, I needed to use rsync over ssh. The ssh daemon on the remote server runs on a non-standard port, and all the port related options to rsync only change settings if you’re running the rsync-daemon.

After some searching, the man page of rsync  offered a solution:

rsync -avz -e "ssh -p $portNumber" /localpath user@remoteip:/remotepath

 

Rsync (Remote Sync): 10 Practical Examples of Rsync Command in Linux

Rsync (Remote Sync) is a most commonly used command for copying and synchronizing files and directories remotely as well as locally in Linux/Unix systems. With the help of rsync command you can copy and synchronize your data remotely and locally across directories, across disks and networks, perform data backups and mirroring between two Linux machines.

This article explains 10 basic and advanced usage of the rsync command to transfer your files remotely and locally in Linux based machines. You don’t need to be root user to run rsync command.

Some advantages and features of Rsync command
  1. It efficiently copies and sync files to or from a remote system.
  2. Supports copying links, devices, owners, groups and permissions.
  3. It’s faster than scp (Secure Copy) because rsync uses remote-update protocol which allows to transfer just the differences between two sets of files. First time, it copies the whole content of a file or a directory from source to destination but from next time, it copies only the changed blocks and bytes to the destination.
  4. Rsync consumes less bandwidth as it uses compression and decompression method while sending and receiving data both ends.

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