Changing the DATE and TIME on your LINUX server

The set of instructions below worked quickly and easily for your Linux Server

You must be logged on as “root” to make this change:

Login to Linux box as root and enter root’s password:

[me@myserver]

Check the current date and time of the Linux box by entering:

[root@mybox me]# date
Linux yields the current settings:
[root@mybox me]# Wed Apr 7 12:03:45 EDT 2004

Change the current time and date of the Linux box by entering:
[root@mybox me]# date 040713032004
would change the time and yield:
[root@mybox me]$ Wed Apr 7 13:03:00 EDT 2004

Disable Telnet Access

Telnet should be disabled, and you should use SSH. Telnet sends password in plain text, and ‘crackers/hackers’ can obtain these passwords easily compared to SSH, and then takeover your dedicated web server. 1. Login to your dedicated server via SSH as root.

2. Type: pico -w /etc/xinetd.d/telnet

3. Change the disable = no line to disable = yes.

4. CTRL+X then Y then enter to save the file.

5. Restart xinted. Type: /etc/rc.d/init.d/xinetd restart

Server Security Considerations

>Server security is as important as network security because servers
often hold a great deal of an organization’s vital information. If a
server is compromised, all of its contents may become available for the
cracker to steal or manipulate at will. The following sections detail
some of the main issues.
Continue reading Server Security Considerations

Current Problems with Linux

Over the past few articles, we have been extolling the virtues of Linux, and how and why you should use it. This article is slightly different. We are sure that many Windows users who read the previous articles scoffed at various points. Well, in this article, we are going to wear our Windows hat, and try to look at Linux from the point of view of a Windows evangelist.
Continue reading Current Problems with Linux